Homemade Graham Crackers

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I’ve always thought graham crackers were something you got out of a box. Period. Not that I thought they would be so difficult that they were beyond my skill level, or that they required some kind of strange ingredients, but I really just never thought about it. Let’s face it, they’re pretty readily available already made. And to be honest, I’ve always thought that they were more of a vehicle–a handy, edible way to get toasty, sticky marshmallows from a campfire fork to my mouth with a minimum of mess. Mmmm. S’mores.

Ingredients

Directions


1. Preheat oven to 350˚ F. Cut butter into flour until it resembles coarse sand or cornmeal.

2. Add brown sugar, cinnamon, baking soda, cream of tartar, and egg and begin to mix.  Add enough hot water to the mixture to make dough that can be rolled like pastry. If the dough seems to want to fall apart, you may want to work it and knead it just 2-3 times with your hands, either in the bowl or on a board with a little flour, just enough so that it sticks together in a ball. (See my comments above for discussion of kneading vs. no-kneading.)

3. On an ungreasedbaking sheet—I used a big one, a 13 x 18” jelly roll pan which was just about perfect– or a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, roll dough into1/8”-1/4” inch thick rectangle. If the dough is too sticky to roll with a rolling pin, it also works to pat and press the dough out with your fingers dipped in flour.

4. Using a pizza cutter, a wheel or a knife, cut dough into 3-inch squares. (Cut well—they’ll bake back together, but don’t worry; you’ll be able to break them apart when cool.) Prick squares with a fork at regular intervals.  Optional: Sprinkle with white sugar for a little sweetness on the top.

5. Bake 15 to 20 minutes, just until barely browned at edges. Cool on rack. Optional: Brush tops of warm cookies with butter and sprinkle with sugar. (Much to the sound of Rev. Graham rolling in his grave.)

Tip: Graham flour, because it’s less adulterated than refined flour and still includes the wheat germ, will go bad more quickly than other more processed flours. (Natural oils in the germ, which most mills leave out of the finished product, can go rancid at room temp). It’s annoying, but it’s really a good thing, since you’re getting more of the original whole grain. If you don’t think you’ll use up your bag within a month or two, think about keeping it in the fridge or freezer.



Makes about 36 3"X3" crackers Print this Recipe

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